EECS
EECS

Research News

Tool for structuring data creates efficiency for data scientists

Transforming messy data into a usable state turns out to be labor-intensive and tedious. Traditionally, domain experts handwrite task-specific scripts to transform unstructured data. Enter Foofah, a project developed by CSE graduate students Zhongjun Jin and Michael Anderson, Prof. Michael Cafarella, and Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science H.V. Jagadish that can help to minimize the effort and required background knowledge needed to clean up data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  Graduate Students  Jagadish, HV  

An even smaller world's smallest computer

The Michigan team behind the original Michigan Micro Mote, the world's smallest computer, has gone even smaller, with a device that measures just 0.3 mm to a side -- dwarfed by a grain of rice. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Health and Safety  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Millimeter-scale Computing  Phillips, Jamie D.  Sensing and Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  

Undocumented immigrants' privacy at risk online, on phones

Every day, undocumented immigrants in the U.S. face discrimination, surveillance, deportation, and other dangers. When it comes to their smartphones, immigrants struggle to apply instinctive caution, according to a study by a team of University of Michigan researchers that included CSE PhD student Allison McDonald. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  

How to color-code nearly invisible nanoparticles

L. Jay Guo and his team are applying color-coding to particles that are about the size of color itself, allowing scientists to quickly determine the size of nanoparticles, which can help in biomedical drug delivery, biological sensors, advanced coatings, and lithography of more advanced computer chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Cafarella Receives VLDB Test of Time Award for Structured Web Data Search

This award is given to the VLDB paper published ten years earlier that has had the most influence since its publication. In this paper, Cafarella and co-authors Alon Halevy, Zhe Daisy Wang, Eugene Wu, and Yang Zhang set out to determine how to provide search-engine-style access to huge volumes of structured web data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  

Designing a flexible future for massive data centers

The days of bulky, expensive servers filling up data centers may be numbered: a new approach recreates the power of a large server by linking up and pooling the resources of smaller computers with fast networking technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

Study maps careers of CS PhDs using decades of data

Of the many burning questions in the world of computing research, the one most dear to a student's heart has typically been the least investigated: what happens after a PhD in computer science? Prof. Danai Koutra and CSE PhD student Tara Safavi set out to provide the world's first data-driven answer, analyzing several decades of post-PhD computing careers using a large new dataset rich with professional information. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Data and Computing  Koutra, Danai  

"Stitching" together a web user from scattered, messy data

Modern internet users submit a massive trove of personal details to the web - but they scatter their data across dozens of websites, accounts, and devices with very little continuity. Prof. Danai Koutra will work to "stitch" these personal details together into a cohesive, useful whole, making a user's time online a more pleasant, continuous experience across devices with better product and service recommendations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Data and Computing  Koutra, Danai  

Building a security standard for a post-quantum future

Chris Peikert, with a team of eleven other researchers, has submitted a cryptographic scheme as a proposed standard to the NIST Post-Quantum Cryptography project. Called FrodoKEM, this family of encryption algorithms is designed to be a conservative and practical implementation of one of the most-studied approaches in the post-quantum cryptography field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Peikert, Chris  Quantum Science and Technology  

Harvesting clean hydrogen fuel through artificial photosynthesis

A new device can double the previous efficiency of using solar energy to break apart water and harvest hydrogen. This new device, developed by Professor Zetian Mi and researchers at McGill University, opens the path to commercial viability. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Mi, Zetian  Sustainability and Environment  

Light could make semiconductor computers a million times faster or even go quantum

Professor Mackillo Kira is working on a technique to manipulate electrons with light that could bring quantum computing up to room temperature. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kira, Mackillo  Optics and Photonics  Quantum Science and Technology  

$6.25M project will decode worlds most complex networks

A new $6.25 million project built on game theory and led by Professors Mingyan Liu and Michael Wellman will develop tools to understand and shape online and on-the-ground networks that drive human decision making. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Liu, Mingyan  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Wellman, Michael  

CSE researchers win Best of SELSE award

have won the the best paper award at the 14th Workshop on Silicon Errors in Logic - System Effects (SELSE) for their paper entitled "Low Cost Transient Fault Protection Using Loop Output Prediction." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mahlke, Scott  

Organic solar cells reach record efficiency, benchmark for commercialization

The team led by Professor Stephen Forrest built record efficient, multi-layered organic solar cells that will be able to curve in clothing or be transparently built into windows. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Power and Energy  Sustainability and Environment  

Solar cells enable self-powered camera

Prof. Euisik Yoon and post-doc Sung-Yun Park developed a self-powered image sensor by placing a photovoltaic diode behind the photodetector diode, collecting the photons that pass through and converting them into electricity. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Internet of Things  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

Improving communication between humans and robots in 20 noisy questions

A team of information scientists led by Prof. Alfred Hero have discovered a better way to facilitate communication between humans and robots, using a twist on the classic game of 20 Questions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Hero, Alfred  Information Technology  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Dmitry Berenson receives NSF CAREER Award to advance a robot's ability to handle soft objects

Prof. Dmitry Berenson was awarded an NSF CAREER award to improve the ability of autonomous robots to handle soft, deformable objects. The project is entitled Towards General-Purpose Manipulation of Deformable Objects through Control and Motion Planning with Distance Constraints." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Control Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

SMAP Update: A mission to manage water globally

Three Miichigan faculty (Prof. Kamal Sarabandi, Prof. Leung Tsang, and Dr. Leland Pierce) are working to improve the information about global soil moisture in the NASA mission called Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Pierce, Leland E.  Sarabandi, Kamal  Sensing and Sensors  Tsang, Leung  

Preventing deadly hospital infections with machine learning

New machine learning models tailored to individual hospitals could give them a much earlier prediction of which patients are most likely to develop C. difficile, potentially helping them stave off infection before it starts. The models are detailed in a paper published today in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wiens, Jenna  

Michigan researchers discover vulnerabilities in next-generation connected vehicle technology

The US Department of Transportation has started implementing I-SIG, a vehicle-to-infrastructure technology that uses real-time vehicle trajectory data to intelligently control the duration and sequence of traffic signals. With the use of this system, comes vulnerabilities, and Michigan researchers have demonstrated that even one single cyberattack can greatly manipulate the intelligent traffic control algorithm in the current I-SIG system and cause severe traffic jams. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  

Duncan Steel Co-Editor-in-Chief of Encyclopedia of Modern Optics, 2nd edition

Duncan Steel, Robert J. Hiller Professor of Engineering, is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the second edition of the Encyclopedia of Modern Optics, published by Elsevier. Topics covered include classical and quantum optics, lasers, optical fibers and optical fiber systems, optical materials and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Optics and Photonics  Steel, Duncan  

Cuba "sonic attacks" - a covert accident?

The purported "sonic attacks" that sickened U.S. and Canadian government workers in Cuba last year could have been an accidental side effect of attempted eavesdropping, says Prof. Kevin Fu, who with his colleagues reverse-engineered the attacks in a lab. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Embedded Systems  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

New computing system to enable deep space missions

A new radiation-hardened, multi-processor, Arm-based spacecraft processor is being developed at Michigan in a project led by Boeing and funded by NASA. Prof. Ron Dreslinski is leading the research at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mudge, Trevor  

Chat tool simplifies tricky online privacy policies

Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, and his collaborators have created an automated chatbot that uses artificial intelligence to weed through the fine print of privacy policies so that you will know what you're agreeing to. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Shin, Kang G.  

Michigan researchers predict emotions by examining the correlation between tweets and environmental factors

Research fellow Carmen Banea, alumna Vicki Liu, and Prof. Rada Mihalcea explored the concept of grounded emotions, focusing on how external factors, ranging from weather, news exposure, social network emotion charge, timing, and mood predisposition may have a bearing on ones emotion level throughout the day. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Mihalcea, Rada  

Internet-scanning U-M startup pioneers new approach to cybersecurity

Ann Arbor-based Censys has launched based on work done over the past 5 years in Prof. J. Alex Halderman's lab. Censys is the first commercially available internet-wide scanning tool. It helps IT experts working to secure large networks, which are composed of a constantly changing array of devices ranging from servers to smartphones and internet-of-things devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Prof. Amir Mortazawi Introduces Robust Wireless Power Transfer

In this video, Prof. Mortazawi introduces his work in improving wireless charging. Compared to conventional methods of wireless power, which require a specific distance and alignment, Prof. Mortazawi's version operates over a range of distances and orientations without a drop in power. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mortazawi, Amir  Power and Energy  Wireless Systems  

Semiconductor Breakthrough May Be Game-changer for Organic Solar Cells

In an advance that could push cheap, ubiquitous solar power closer to reality, Prof. Stephen Forrest and his team have found a way to coax electrons to travel much further than was previously thought possible in the materials often used for organic solar cells and other organic semiconductors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability and Environment  

Reimagining how computers are designed: University of Michigan leads new $32M center

The Center for Applications Driving Architectures, or ADA, at the University of Michigan will develop a transformative, "plug-and-play" ecosystem to encourage a flood of fresh ideas in computing frontiers such as autonomous control, robotics and machine-learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

U-M startup May Mobility blazes toward autonomous fleet market

May Mobility, co-founded and led by Prof. Edwin Olson, has tested its autonomous vehicles on the streets of Downtown Detroit. The startup recently licensed five autonomous driving related technologies from U-M, and outside of the life sciences, is the most successful UM startup in raising first round of funding so quickly. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

CSE Researchers Funded to Enhance Online Communication

Profs. Danai Koutra and Walter Lasecki have been awarded two grants from Trove.ai, an Ann-Arbor based artificial intelligence startup, to develop novel methods and tools that will unleash the power of online communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

New quick-learning neural network powered by memristors

Prof. Wei Lu led a team in creating a new type of neural network made with memristors, which can dramatically improve the efficiency of teaching machines to think like humans. The network, called a reservoir computing system, could predict words before they are said during conversation, and help predict future outcomes based on the present. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Unhackable Computer Under Development with $3.6M DARPA Grant

By turning computer circuits into unsolvable puzzles, a University of Michigan team aims to create an unhackable computer with a new $3.6 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Todd Austin, a professor of computer science and engineering, leads the project, called MORPHEUS. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Cybersecurity  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

A shoe-box-sized chemical detector

Prof. Mohammed Islam developed a small chemical sensor device that will be able to detect "single-fingerprint quantities" of substances from a distance of more than 100 feet away. It could potentially be used to identify traces of drugs and explosives and speed the analysis of certain medical samples. It could also be mounted on a drone or carried by doctors, police, border officials and soldiers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  Optics and Photonics  

New biodegradable hydrogel offers eco-friendly alternative to synthetics

Professor Jerzy Kanicki and an international team of collaborators have developed a new hydrogel made from natural and biodegradable materials that allows for applications in agriculture and medicine without the potential risks of synthetic hydrogels. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kanicki, Jerzy  Sustainability and Environment  

Seed-sized U-M computers pumped into oil wells featured at the Houston Museum of Natural Science

A specially created version of the Michigan Micro Mote, measuring 5mmx5mm, is being featured for its role in oil exploration as part of a new exhibit at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Energy Science and Engineering  Grbic, Anthony  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Phillips, Jamie D.  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

3D Printing Technology Facilitates Fabrication Of A Curved Organic Photodetector For Image Sensing Devices

Prof. Jerzy Kanicki and his team developed a new fabrication method for curved substrates using a 3D printing process. The technique will enable next-generation camera systems or artificial eyes, as well as high performance image sensing devices for breast cancer detection and other more. Read the paper in Advanced Materials Technologies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Kanicki, Jerzy  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

2017 CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition Highlights Outstanding Research

CSE held its fourteenth annual CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition on November 8. The top presentation competition was "Analyzing and Enhancing the Security of Modern Memory Systems," given by Salessawi Ferede Yitbarek, who represented CSE's Hardware research area. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Prof. Chris Peikert Receives TCC Test of Time Award for Work in Lattice Cryptography

Chris Peikert, the Patrick C. Fischer Development Professor in Theoretical Computer Science, and his co-author Alon Rosen have received the TCC Test of Time Award for their paper on efficient collision-resistant hashing on cyclic lattices. The award is a recognition of a long line of works by Prof. Peikert and others who laid the foundations for practically efficient lattice-based cryptography. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  

Michigan Researchers Win Best Paper Award at DFT 2017

John P. Hayes, Claude E. Shannon Professor of Engineering Science, and CSE graduate student Paishun Ting have received the Best Paper Award at the 30th IEEE Symposium on Defect and Fault Tolerance for their work in eliminating a hidden source of error in stochastic circuits. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Graduate Students  Hayes, John  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

New Funding for High-Fidelity Nerve Mapping Research

The NIH's Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC) program awarded a U-M project $1 million in funding to develop highly-compliant microneedle arrays for peripheral nerve mapping. The team's project director and principal investigator is John Seymour. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health and Safety  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

U-M Receives $1.6M Toward Artificial Intelligence for Data Science

A team from the University of Michigan has received $1.6 million from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to help develop a toolkit so that anyone can use big data to help answer questions and ultimately speed up the process of discovery. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Balzano, Laura  Big Data  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  

Cooling off with Lasers

Prof. Stephen Rand and his team are studying how to use lasers to cool down solid matter. Besides breaking common notions about lasers, there are several applications for the refrigeration of solids with light. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lasers and Optics  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

Precise pulses explore light's magnetism

A new laser will investigate an unusual magnetic effect that may lead to efficient solar energy harvesting. The new laser facility is housed in the Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO), directed by Prof. Stephen Rand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers and Optics  Optics and Photonics  Power and Energy  Rand, Stephen  

Doubling the power of the world's most intense laser

The most intense laser in the world is about to get a power upgrade with $2 million from the National Science Foundation. With more laser energy to focus, researchers at the University of Michigan and collaborators from around the world can make better tabletop devices that produce particle and X-ray beams for medical and national security applications and also explore mysteries in astrophysics and the quantum realm [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers and Optics  Maksimchuk, Anatoly  Nees, John A.  Optics and Photonics  Willingale, Louise  

Wearables to boost security of voice-based log-in

Voice authentication is easy to spoof. New technology could help close this open channel. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Shin, Kang G.  

Precision Health at Michigan

Learn more about Michigan's new initiative to lead in precision health: using advanced tools and technology to provide personalized solutions to improve an individual's health and wellness. Lead by co-director Eric Michielssen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Big Data  Health and Safety  Michielssen, Eric  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Manos Kapritsos and Collaborators Win USENIX Security Paper Award

A team of researchers including Prof. Manos Kapritsos has won a Distinguished Paper Award at the 2017 USENIX Security Symposium for Vale, a new programming language and tool that supports flexible, automated verification of high-performance cryptographic assembly code. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Kapritsos, Manos  Lab-Software Systems  

Using University of Michigan buildings as batteries

Michigan researchers and staff are testing how to use the immense thermal energy of large buildings as theoretical battery packs. The goal is to help the nations grid better accommodate renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Sustainability and Environment  

Michigan, Georgia Tech Researchers Funded to Deter Financial Market Manipulation

Researchers at the University of Michigan and the Georgia Institute of Technology will develop innovative approaches to detecting and deterring the computerized manipulation of financial markets under a $1M grant from the National Science Foundations's Big Data program. Michael Wellman, the Lynn A. Conway Collegiate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, is project director and one of five PIs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Show All