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EECS

EECS in the News

3 Questions with: Jenna Wiens

Jenna Wiens focuses on developing the computational methods needed to help organize, process, and transform patient data into actionable knowledge. The Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation hosted her for a seminar on how to augment clinical care with AI. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wiens, Jenna  

An electronically tunable metasurface that rotates polarization

Phys.org highlights Prof. Anthony Grbic's research in developing a transparent, electronically tunable metasurface as part of a $7.5M MURI project. Also featured is PhD student, Zhanni Wu, who is a member of Grbic's team. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Grbic, Anthony  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

AI Needs Memory to Get Cozier with Compute

The EE Times highlights Prof. Wei Lu's company, Crossbar, and the work its doing to improve AI by combining advanced acceleration hardware, resistive RAM (ReRAM), and optimized neural networks to create ready-made, power-efficient solutions with unsupervised learning and event-recognition capability. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lu, Wei  

ECE professors help robots better navigate the world

IEEE Spectrum highlights a new chip designed by Professors Dennis Sylvester, David Blaauw, and Hun-Seok Kim, along with PhD student Ziyun Li, that improves robots' use of simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer Vision  Kim, Hun-Seok  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  Sylvester, Dennis  

As 2020 nears, pressure grows to replace voting machines

Time and money are running short for states to replace aging or inadequate voting machines before the 2020 presidential primaries. This article summarizes the challenges in updating voting technology before the 2020 elections, and quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman's recent congressional testimony: With the 2020 election on the horizon, the next major target for foreign cyberattacks, we need to act before its too late. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

State election officials opt for 2020 voting machines vulnerable to hacking

Politico describes how some states are purchasing new voting machines to improve security -- but the ones they're choosing, called called ballot-marking devices, are relatively untested, says Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

A Question For 2020: Are Our Voting Systems Secure?

In this podcast, Diane Rehm interviews Prof. J. Alex Halderman about the security profile of the US voting system and asks the question: As we approach 2020, have states made the necessary changes to protect how we vote? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Your Hard Drive May Be Listening

Researchers led by Prof. Kevin Fu demonstrated that a hard drive can be used as a microphone, allowing attackers to listen in to conversations. The team proposes defenses against every attack they develop, but Fu is still concerned about the implications this has for sensitive sensor-driven systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cyber-physical systems  Cybersecurity  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Systems  

What the U.S. Can Learn About Electronic Voting From This Tiny Eastern European Nation

This article describes the system of electronic voting used by the Baltic country of Estonia, which is often held up by many as a model for how electronic voting can be done right. It then interviews Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who conducted a security audit of the Estonian system in 2014 and found a series of alarming problems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The Moores Law for Self-Driving Vehicles

According to Prof. Edwin Olson, CEO of May Mobility, self-driving cars today are only 0.01% as good as humans. To get as good it'll take 16 years. Why? Check out his newest Medium post. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Whitmer recognizes Mourou's Nobel Prize

Governor Whitmer declares Thursday, February 28, 2019 "Chirped Pulse Amplification Day" in recognition of the work that led to the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics for Gerard Mourou, the A. D. Moore Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of ECE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mourou, Gerard A.  Optics and Photonics  

U-M could invest up to $20 million in four of its startups

Prof. Wei Lu's startup, MemryX, receives $1M from U-M for developing an in-memory computing system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

How the Internet of Things could bring hackers into your kitchen (or bedroom)

This article and video describes vulnerabilities that exist in Internet of Things devices, and highlights work done by Prof. Kevin Fu that demonstrates how devices can be controlled by sound waves. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Innovative project tests the boundaries of HVAC demand response systems

Electric Light & Power highlights Prof. Johanna Mathieu's $2.9M ARPA to use air conditioners to advance a renewable power grid. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Energy Science and Engineering  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Sustainability and Environment  

Ann Arbor's May Mobility raises $22 million to deploy driverless shuttles across US

All About AnnArbor reports that May Mobility, the autonomous shuttle company co-founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, has raised $22M during its recent Series A funding round. The company is expanding its facilities and reach. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

May Mobility secures $22 million investment amid expansion

Crain's Detroit Business reports that May Mobility, the autonomous shuttle company co-founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, has raised $22M during its recent Series A funding round. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

The Growing Tension Between Undergraduate and K-12: Is CS for All, or Just Those Who Get Past the Caps?

Last month, the New York Times ran an article "The Hard Part of Computer Science? Getting Into Class" about the dramatic increase in undergraduate enrollment, and the inability of US computer science departments to keep pace with the demand. Prof. Mark Guzdial reflects on the trend and its historical precedent. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Education  Engineering Education Research  Guzdial, Mark  Lab-Interactive Systems  

Research team investigating Internet censorship with tracking system

A group of researchers led by Prof. Roya Ensafi is investigating Internet censorship. The team created a system called Censored Planet that monitors and reports when access to websites is blocked. The team is seeking to understand which websites governments are blocking and why. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Ensafi, Roya  Information Technology  Lab-Systems  

Self-driving cars could deploy sooner using air traffic control technique, UM researchers say

This article highlights the work of Prof. Walter Lasecki, who is working to create hybrid human/AI systems that can handle exceptional situations that could move forward the release of technologies such as autonomous transportation networks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

Stateside: MIs energy infrastructure; mother of modern office design; pushback on Title IX changes

Prof. Johanna Mathieu talks to NPR about what we learned about Michigan's energy infrastructure during the Polar Vortex, and what we could do to avert a similar situation in the future. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Sustainability and Environment  

University launches Commission on Carbon Neutrality

Prof. Stephen Forrest serves as co-chair of the new commission that will define carbon neutrality in the context of U-M and set a timeline and recommend strategies to achieve that goal. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Sustainability and Environment  

The Punishing Polar Vortex is Ideal for Cassie the Robot

WIRED features ECE professor Jessy Grizzle and our favorite bipedal robot in a story about how testing Cassie in extreme weather events could help save lives in the future. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Spotting Fake News (video)

In this One Detroit report, Prof. Rada Mihalcea and research scientist Veronica Perez-Rosas describe their work in weeding out fake news stories from the real stories using a unique algorithm. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Perez-Rosas, Veronica  

A poker-playing robot goes to work at the Pentagon

Lynn A. Conway Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Michael Wellman comments on the signal being sent as the Pentagon and other agencies adopt more AI technologies: the technology is maturing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

The Elite Intel Team Still Fighting Meltdown and Spectre

Prof. Thomas Wenisch comments in this article on Intel's efforts to shore up the security of its microprocessors while still competing on performance. Wenisch was one of the researchers who exposed weaknesses in Intel's secure enclave technology via the Foreshadow attack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Cybersecurity  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Wenisch, Thomas  

Why Washtenaw County is home to a special "Super Smash Bros. Melee" community

CSE game development instructor Austin Yarger provides insight in this interview on why the local region has become a Smash hub. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Yarger, Austin  

Freakonomics Radio Live: Featuring Prof. Rada Mihalcea

Listen in to the new Freakonomics to catch Prof. Rada Mihalcea discuss how to increase your odds of finding out if a news article is true or fake and her piece won the episode's live audience vote! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Information Technology  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

The web really isn't worldwide -- every country has different access

Users from certain countries cant visit certain websites not because their governments say so, but because a corporation halfway around the world has made a decision to deny them access. New article by CSE PhD student Allison McDonald at The Conversation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ensafi, Roya  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Information Technology  Lab-Systems  

Why space weather is being made in the lab

National Geographic mentions Prof. Louise Willingale and the HERCULES laser in this story about understanding stellar winds and planetary magnetic fields by duplicating conditions in a laboratory setting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers and Optics  Optics and Photonics  Willingale, Louise  

The Malware of the Future Will Have AI Superpowers

The cybersecurity threats of deep learning and neural networks are emerging. Some learning algorithms can be fooled into making simple but crucial errors, which can lead to more malicious attacks later on. Prof. Atul Prakash and collaborators found that by sticking small black and white stickers on stop signs, they could make them undetectable to the AI algorithms used in self-driving cars. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Prakash, Atul  

Censys, a search engine for internet-connected devices, raises $2.6 million led by GV and Greylock

Cybersecurity startup Censys, co-founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, PhD candidate David Adrian, and alum Zakir Durumeric, announced that it has raised a $2.6 million seed round led by GV and Greylock. The funding will be used as Censys, which just launched as a commercial company last year, seeks to collect more data and develop additional paid services. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Halderman, J. Alex  

The Disappeared: Beyond Winning and Losing

The #MeToo movement is bringing ever-increasing awareness of the challenges faced by women in STEM. Emerita Prof. Lynn Conway drew upon her unique life-experiences in the industry, and wrote insights in an invited-essay in a Special Issue of IEEE Computer Magazine on "Winning and Losing in IT." This PDF is copyright IEEE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Women in Computing  

Online censorship in Saudi Arabia soared after Jamal Khashoggis murder

This story highlights how tools such as Censored Planet, developed by Research Prof. Roya Ensafi, have shed light on state-sponsored censorship activities such as the measures that were put in place recently in Saudi Arabia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Ensafi, Roya  Lab-Systems  

A moral code for coders: Should ethics be part of the computer science curriculum?

This airing of Stateside on Michigan Radio includes an audio interview with Bernard A. Galler Professor of EECS HV Jagadish on the moral questions companies should ask when working with private information, and how best to incorporate ethics into coding and computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Systems  

Trolley Folly

A favorite debate around self-driving vehicles is the trolley problem: a self-driving vehicle finds itself in a pickle and must choose between two terrible outcomes. See what Prof. Edwin Olson has to say on this much talked-about conundrum in his new article on Medium. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

A stellar achievement: Magnetized space winds in the laboratory

The international team that includes Prof. Louise Willingale is investigating the role of intense magnetic fields dragged by high-speed plasmas through astrophysical environments. HERCULES was used in the experiments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers and Optics  Optics and Photonics  Space technology  Willingale, Louise  

Here's how an AI lie detector can tell when you're fibbing

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has worked on deception detection for about a decade. Popular Science looks at how she constructed one AI deception detector, and how it works. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

A look at the election security charges in Georgias governors race

An already tight governors race in Georgia devolved into new chaos Monday after the Republican candidate, who is also the states chief election official, alleged with little evidence that Democrats sought to hack a voter database that will be used in Tuesdays elections. CSE PhD student Matthew Bernhard told the AP that anyone with access to an individual voters personal information could alter that voters record in the system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The internet security company Dug Song is betting on

UM spinoff Censys, co-founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, PhD candidate David Adrian, and alum Zakir Durumeric, monitors all devices connected to the internet for threats. IT staff at companies can use Censys to discover new threats and assess their possible impact. The company attracted early attention from Duo Security's Dug Song, and plans to begin raising a much larger Series A round later in 2019 or in 2020. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Parabricks finds a niche to target its computing power

Parabricks LLC, a 2015 spinoff from the University of Michigan that signed an exclusive licensing agreement with the school last year, was co-founded by Prof. Scott Mahlke. In October, Parabricks was awarded a National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research Phase II grant of $748,000, which came with a matching grant of $125,000 from the Michigan Emerging Technologies Fund. That followed an NSF SBIR Phase I grant of $225,000 in 2017, which had a matching state grant of $25,000. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mahlke, Scott  

Q&A | Dont kid yourself, U.S. enemies are trying to hack our elections

As a national expert on election system security, Prof. J. Alex Halderman has never shied away from explaining how Americas election systems can and have been hacked. The University of Michigan computer science professor stops short of saying vote counts have been changed, but notes Russians tapped into voter registration lists in some states in 2016, and that he and fellow election-hack experts have demonstrated how state election systems can be infiltrated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

J. Alex Halderman on Election Systems and Vulnerabilities

C-SPAN Prof. J. Alex Halderman talked on C-SPAN about voting machine security and vulnerabilities in US election systems. He took questions from live callers and online viewers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Ahead of important elections, U.S. voting system is still vulnerable to hacking

This CBC Radio Q&A with Prof. J. Alex Halderman focuses on vulnerabilities that exist in the US voting system, as well as telephone voting in Canada and the US. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The Quest to Build Robotic Hands

In this article, Prof. Dmitry Berenson comments on the evolution of robots. Humans can readily manipulate all kinds of object, but robots need better mechanics and a lot more intelligence. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Should You Be Afraid of Election Hacking? Here's What Experts Say

This article examines what it means to hack an election and what vulnerabilities exist. Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted on where we are with respect to this challenge. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The midterms are already hacked. You just dont know it yet.

This in-depth investigation into the US election system reveals frightening vulnerabilities at almost every level. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard regarding some of vulnerabilities that exist. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Self-driving cars will have to decide who should live and who should die. Heres who humans would kill.

In this article, Prof. Benjamin Kuipers comments on a study that surveys preferences for who to spare when an autonomous vehicle must crash. Kuipers says that the focus should actually be "If we can imagine a situation where this dilemma could occur, what prior decision should I have made to avoid this?" [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

How hackable are American voting machines? It depends who you ask

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is on a crusade to demonstrate how vulnerable American voting machines are, and some of his arguments are quite compelling. He has rigged mock elections. He has testified to the machines vulnerabilities in Congress and in court. He has even managed to turn a commonly used voting machine into an iteration of the classic arcade game Pac-Man. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Security Seals Used to Protect Voting Machines Can Be Easily Opened With Shim Crafted from a Soda Can

Election officials say security ties and seals prevent anyone with physical access to voting machines from manipulating them. CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard has shown how he can easily defeat them with just a soda can. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The Tinder for Markets Is Run on Crypto

In this article, Lynn A. Conway Professor of CSE Michael Wellman comments on the hedge fund Numerai and its market, which crowdsources data scientists to make predictions and is based on the cryptocurrency Numeraire. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

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