Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE News

How to prevent Russian hackers from attacking the 2018 election

In this commentary piece in the Chicago Tribune, Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Justin Talbot-Zorn make the case for a straightforward policy agenda to secure America's voting systems against the threat of hackers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

CS Alumnae Tara Safavi Chosen for Google Women Techmakers Scholarship

Tara Safavi (BS CS 17) has been selected as a recipient of the Google Women Techmakers Scholarship to continue her studies in computer science and engineering. Tara will return to Michigan this Fall to pursue her PhD in CSE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

If Voting Machines Were Hacked, Would Anyone Know?

In the article, Prof. J. Alex Halderman points out how electronic voting systems even those not connected to the Internet can be compromised. One path for hackers is to attack the computers that are used to program the ballots, which are later transferred to voting machines via memory cards. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Mary Lou Dorf Retires; Her Focus Was On Opening Doors to Computer Science

Collegiate Lecturer Dr. Mary Lou Dorf has retired after 15 years at the University of Michigan in the Computer Science and Engineering Division of the EECS Department. During her career at Michigan, Dr. Dorf worked tirelessly to open the doors of computer science to everyone. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  

Beyster Collections showcase a lifetime of ideas from U-M alum

Three permanent exhibits on U-Ms North Campus pay tribute to the achievements of Michigan Engineer J. Robert Beyster. [Full Story]

Valeria Bertacco Appointed Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Initiatives at Rackham Graduate School

Prof. Valeria Bertacco has been selected to serve as Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Initiatives at the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. The Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Initiatives serves as the primary liaison between the Rackham School and academic units in the physical sciences and engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  

CSE Staff Outing at the Nichols Arboretum

On June 2nd, the CSE staff took a leisurely walk in the Nichols Arboretum to explore the natural environment and to view the blooming Peony Garden. With nearly 800 peonies at peak bloom, the arboretum is home to the largest collection of heirloom herbaceous peonies in North America. [Full Story]

Engineers Bring Education to Disadvantaged Children in Ecuador

CE undergrad Sam Tenka traveled to Ecuador with a team of four multidisciplinary engineers to work with youth who have not had the chance to attend school. As part of the Engineering Honors GO program, the team stayed in the city of Quito for two weeks to aid the Street Children Work project. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Eric Vander Weele: Building Bloomberg LP

Since graduating from U-M, Eric N. Vander Weele (BSE CS 08, MS CSE 10), has helped grow Bloombergs technology division and increased efficiency and production for employees and clients. He focuses on how to reuse and integrate existing C/C++ libraries within Python, how to improve productivity for other developers, and how to manage and monitor the deployment of Python applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Lattice Data Makes Gift to Michigan Computer Science and Engineering Fund

Lattice Data, Inc. has recently provided a gift to the College of Engineering to benefit the Computer Science and Engineering Division of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Lattice was cofounded by Prof. Michael Cafarella. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  

Breakthrough for Large Scale Computing: Memory Disaggregation Made Practical

CSE researchers have introduced Infiniswap, the first system to scalably implement cluster-wide memory disaggregation, whereby the memory of all the servers in a computing cluster is transparently exposed as a single memory pool to all the applications in the cluster. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Shin, Kang G.  Software Systems  

CSE Receives NCWIT Award for Recruiting and Retention Efforts of Women in Computing

The Computer Science and Engineering Division has received a NCWIT Extension Services Transformation (NEXT) Award for excellence in promoting women in undergraduate computing. Sponsored by the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) and Google, the NEXT Awards honor academic departments that show significant positive outcomes in increasing womens meaningful participation in computing education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Brian Noble Named Chair of Computer Science and Engineering

Influential educator and computer scientist Brian Noble has been selected as the new chair of the Computer Science and Engineering division of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Noble, Brian  

U.S. Hospitals Not Immune to Crippling Cyber Attacks

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu comments on the vulnerabilities that exist in hospital and healthcare systems and devices. The recent strike by the ransomware program called WannaCry demonstrates that these shortcomings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Health  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

Apple Just Acquired This Little-Known Artificial Intelligence Startup

CSE Prof. Michael Cafarella is a co-founder of the startup Lattice Data, which builds on statistical inference and machine learning to solve problems using dark data. Apple has acquired Lattice, which recently emerged from stealth mode, for $200M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Databases and Data Mining  Lab-Software Systems  

Apple acquires AI company Lattice Data, a specialist in unstructured dark data, for $200M

CSE Prof. Michael Cafarella is a co-founder of the startup Lattice Data, which builds on statistical inference and machine learning to solve problems using dark data. Apple has acquired Lattice, which recently emerged from stealth mode, for $200M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Databases and Data Mining  Lab-Software Systems  

Smartphone security hole: "Open port" backdoors are common

The College of Engineering reports on work by computer science security researchers which has revealed that so-called "open ports" are much more vulnerable to security breaches than previously thought. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Picting, not Writing, is the Literacy of Todays Youth

This blog post by Thurnau Prof. Elliot Soloway and his collaborator Cathie Norris looks at the disconnect between existing instructional materials (90% text) and how K-12 students communicate and consume (90% image-based), with ramifications for educational practices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

2017 ISCA Influential Paper Award for Groundbreaking Research in Power-efficient Computing

For their groundbreaking research in power-efficient computing, faculty and former students of the department received the 2017 ACM SIGARCH and IEEE-CS TCCA ISCA Influential Paper Award. The researchers developed a method to intelligently put parts of a computer's memory into a low power mode to save energy. Since 2002, the technique has been adopted by major chip manufacturers, and has continued to be exploited in subsequent research by the authors themselves. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Mudge, Trevor  

Wellman and Rajan on the Ethics of Automated Trading

In this audio interview at Algocracy and the Transhumanist Project, Prof. Michael Wellman and Business Administration Prof. Uday Rajan comment on the ethics of autonomous trading agents on financial markets. The discussion encompasses algorithmic trading, high frequency trading, market manipulation, the AI control problem, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Hundreds of popular Android apps have open ports, making them prime targets for hacking

This article reports on the work done by CSE researchers Yunhan Jack Jia, Qi Alfred Chen, Yikai Lin, Chao Kong, and Prof. Z. Morley Mao in characterizing a widespread vulnerability in popular Android apps. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Open Ports Create Backdoors in Millions of Smartphones

This article reports on work by CSE researchers who have characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data by using open ports to create backdoors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Hacking with Sound Waves

CSE researchers have demonstrated a new way of using sound to interfere with devices containing accelerometers, such as smartphones and self-driving cars. This presents a new avenue for hackers to use in compromising devices to steal information or disrupt communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

An Obscure Flaw Creates Backdoors in Millions of Smartphones

CSE researchers have characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data, and also to install malware and to perform malicious code execution which could be used in large-scale attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Award-Winning Graduate Student Instructors & Instructional Aides

To celebrate the contributions of our graduate and undergraduate instructors, the department selects the best of the best, based on student evaluations, and celebrates them at a special awards ceremony. This event occurred Wednesday, April 26, 2017, when 14 students were recognized for their skill, passion, and care for the students they were charged to assist during the past academic year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

EECS 280 Becomes Third Largest Course at U-M

With almost 1000 students enrolled, EECS 280: Programming and Introductory Data Structures, is a core CS class that has grown in popularity. Course enrollment has increased by almost 200 students in just one year, making it the third largest course for the winter 2017 semester at U-M, and the largest course in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Mary Lou Dorf Named U-M Collegiate Lecturer

Dr. Mary Lou Dorf has been selected for distinction through the U-M Collegiate Lecturer Program. She has made notable contributions to instruction through her reimagining of EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts, and has also been involved in a years-long program to expand the reach of the computer science program offered through the College of LSA. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

James Juett Voted HKN Professor of the Year for CSE

EECS students voted, and Dr. James Juett was named the 2016-2017 HKN Professor of the Year in CSE by the Beta-Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Juett, James  Undergraduate Students  

Fall 2017: Self-Driving Cars: Perception & Control

Course No.: EECS 498-009
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Matthew Johnson-Roberson
Prerequisites: Programming skills in Python & MATLAB, Some C++

Course Description:
This course will teach the theoretical underpinnings of self-driving car algorithms and the practical application of the material in hands-on labs. Highlights will include field trips to M-City, a 32-acre autonomous vehicle site on the U's North Campus, demos and rides in full size autonomous vehicles, and small group work with a competition where students test their own self-driving car algorithms. [More Info]

Mary Lou Dorf Selected for Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize

Dr. Mary Lou Dorf has been selected as a recipient of the 2017 Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize, which recognizes faculty who have made use of innovation to improve student learning. She has been recognized for her work in reimagining EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Fall 2017: EECS 598-004 Laser Plasma Diagnostics

Course No.: EECS 598-004
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Louise Willingale
Prerequisites: EECS 537 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
High power laser pulses are used to both create and diagnose high-energy density systems. In this course, we will discuss the techniques used for creating, characterizing and timing high power laser pulses from megajoule-nanosecond pulses to relativistic-intensity femtosecond pulses. We will explore the diagnostics used to characterize high-energy density plasmas through optical and other radiation measurements as well as backlighting techniques. Other important aspects of performing experiments, such as target positioning techniques, will be touched on. In addition to the material discussed in lectures, students will consider real experimental data and recent research publications to learn analysis techniques, gain appreciation for physical limitations (such as instrument resolution and background signals), and comparison with theoretical models. This course is suitable for graduate students studying plasma physics, optics and laser science and other related areas. [More Info]

Fall 2017: VLSI for Signal Processing and Communication Systems

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Hun-Seok Kim
Prerequisites: See instructor

Course Description:
This course will survey methodologies to design energy efficient and/or high-performance VLSI systems for the state-of-the-art image/audio processing, machine learning, and wireless communication systems. The primary focus of the course is on designing hardware efficient algorithms and energy-aware VLSI IC architectures to deliver the performance and efficiency requiredby various signal processing applications. The course will be a mix of lectures and student-led presentations/projects. The content will be suitable for senior undergraduates or graduate students interested in hardware-efficient signal processing algorithms andtheir VLSI implementations. [More Info]

Courage to Resist: The High-Stakes Adventures of J. Alex Halderman

This story by Randy Milgrom at the UM College of Engineering profiles Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his work in the area of Digital Democracy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Why India Needs A Paper Trail For Free And Fair Elections

This article in the Indian edition of the Huffington Post, references the work that Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators did in 2010 to demonstrate vulnerabilities in India's "tamper-proof" electronic voting machines. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Jack Kosaian Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Recent graduate Jack Kosaian (BSE CS 16) has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to continue his studies in computer science and engineering. He currently works with Professor Mosharaf Chowdhury on developing systems to mitigate load imbalance for data-intensive systems (EC-Cache, OSDI16), and to reduce communication overhead in performing analytics over geographically distributed datasets. [Full Story]

Open Ports Act As Security Wormholes Into Mobile Devices

Computer science and engineering researchers at the University of Michigan have for the first time characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data, and also to install malware and to perform malicious code execution which could be used in large-scale attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Andrew Quinn Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Graduate student Andrew Quinn has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to continue his studies in computer science and engineering at the University of Michigan. Andrew's research creates cluster-scale systems that allow developers to quickly understand and debug programs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

2016-17 Undergraduate Student Awards

Students, parents, and faculty gathered on Friday, March 24, 2017 to celebrate the achievements of EECS students who earned a special award for academic achievement, research, service, or entrepreneurial activities. Khalil Najafi, Chair for Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Peter Chen, Interim Chair for Computer Science and Engineering, presented the awards. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Fall 2017: Quantum Nanotechnology

Course No.: EECS 498-003
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Duncan Steele
Prerequisites: MATH 215/216, PHYSICS 240, co-req of EECS 230

Course Description:
This course aims to introduce students to basic concepts in quantum physics that are relevant to novel device concepts. [More Info]

Nilmini Abeyratne Selected for the Lipschutz, Ayers Host and Olcott Smith Award

The Rackham Graduate School has selected CSE graduate student Nilmini Abeyratne for the Susan Lipschutz, Margaret Ayers Host and Anna Olcott Smith Award. Abeyratne was selected for this award for her contributions towards the success of women and her drive to increase the number of women in science and engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Women in Computing  

Michigan Allots $87 Million to Replace Flints Tainted Water Pipes

Prof. Jacob Abernethy collaborated with Flint officials and colleagues at UM Flint on a study last year that analyzed the Flint water system and the undertaking required to identify and replace lead pipes in homes. He said that the state's just-announced plan for finishing the replacement of thousands of targeted lead pipes in three years seemed possible with enough money and resources. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

The next cyberattack could render your anti-virus and encryption software useless

Researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu and CSE graduate student Timothy Trippel have demonstrated a new way of using sound to interfere with devices containing accelerometers, such as smartphones. This presents a new avenue for hackers to use in compromising devices to steal information or disrupt communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Fall 2017: Power System Dynamics and Control

Course No.: EECS 598-008
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Ian Hiskens
Prerequisites: EECS 463 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will introduce angle and voltage stability concepts and consider control strategies for improving dynamic performance. It will provide an overview of nonlinear dynamical systems, including geometrical properties of solutions, Lyapunov methods for approximating the region of attraction, and bifurcation analysis. [More Info]

University of Michigan students create app to help with food allergies

Computer science students Ish Baid and Michael Copley have created the Edible Project app, which helps people with special dietary restrictions to find restaurants and meals they can enjoy without worrying about allergies or ingredients. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Chris Peikert Named First-Ever Patrick C. Fischer Development Professor

Associate Professor Chris Peikert has been named the first-ever Patrick C. Fischer Development Professor in Theoretical Computer Science. Peikert's research is dedicated to developing new, stronger mathematical foundations for cryptography, with a particular focus on geometric objects called lattices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  

Fall 2017: Beyond CMOS: Emerging Nanotechnologies

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Becky Peterson
Prerequisites: EECS 320 or graduate standing

Course Description:
This course will survey the devices, circuit architectures, and integration challenges facing the semiconductor industry in the "More than Moore" era, using a mix of lectures, discussions, and student-led projects. The content will be suitable for junior/senior undergraduates or graduate students interested in IC design/VLSI or solid state materials and device/nanotechnology. [More Info]

Fall 2017: Introduction to Algorithmic Robotics

Course No.: EECS 498-006
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Dmitry Berenson
Prerequisites: EECS 280 (EECS 281 and MATH 214 are recommended)

Course Description:
An introduction to the algorithms that form the foundation of robot planning, state estimation, and control. Topics include optimization, motion planning, forward and inverse kinematics, position control, representations of uncertainty, Kalman filters, particle filters, and principle component analysis. Assignments focus on programming a robot to perform tasks in simulation. [More Info]

Fall 2017: Introduction to Distributed Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Harsha Madhlastha
Prerequisites: EECS 482

Course Description:
In this class, you will learn the core principles and techniques that apply to enable low latency and high throughput, maximize reliability, and preserve consistency semantics. [More Info]

Timothy Trippel Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Graduate student Timothy Trippel has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to continue his studies in computer science and engineering at the University of Michigan. His research interests lie in embedded systems and IoT security and privacy for the purpose of building safe and reliable autonomous systems in the future. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Smartphone Accelerometers Can Be Fooled by Sound Waves

This article features work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators in which they demonstrate a way to take control of or influence devices such as smartphones through the use of sound waves. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

All CSE News for 2017