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Using drones, a new software tool can bring LTE networks anywhere

Prof. Z. Morley Mao and alumnus Mehrdad Moradi (PhD CSE 2018) earned a best paper award at this year's ACM MobiCom for their work on SkyCore, a reliable new way to deploy LTE networks using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The paper, SkyCore: Moving Core to the Edge for Untethered and Reliable UAV-based LTE networks, demonstrated a way to connect hotspots on drones with commercial networks and smartphones. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  

Toyota funds professorship in AI at U-Michigan

Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja is U-M's first Toyota Professor of Artificial Intelligence. A $3 million gift from Toyota Motor Corporation endows the first named professorship in artificial intelligence at the University of Michigan and provides additional funding to support AI and robotics faculty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Graduate student honors competition highlights outstanding research

CSE held its fifteenth annual CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition on November 7, 2018. The competition is the culmination of a process that narrows a field of entrants from each of the department research areas to a handful of finalists, each of whom gives a summary presentation on an area of their research. CSE faculty and an industry sponsor from Toyota Research Institute ranked the finalists' presentations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Outstanding student research on display

This year, three students working with Prof. Emily Mower Provost were recognized for outstanding projects in their areas at the Graduate Symposium. Katie Matton and Matt Perez won two of the Emerging Research categories, Engineering Innovation and Science Communication, respectively; and John Gideon earned honorable mention for the Richard and Eleanor Towner Prize for Outstanding Ph.D. Research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Here's how an AI lie detector can tell when you're fibbing

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has worked on deception detection for about a decade. Popular Science looks at how she constructed one AI deception detector, and how it works. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Precision Health Award for measuring moods

Prof. Emily Mower Provost and collaborators on the Prechter Bipolar Research team were one of 10 recipients of the Michigan Precision Health Investigators Award. The awards includes grants of up to $300,000 each over two years, and awardees were chosen from among an initial pool of more than 100 applicants with significant research projects. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mower Provost, Emily  

A look at the election security charges in Georgias governors race

An already tight governors race in Georgia devolved into new chaos Monday after the Republican candidate, who is also the states chief election official, alleged with little evidence that Democrats sought to hack a voter database that will be used in Tuesdays elections. CSE PhD student Matthew Bernhard told the AP that anyone with access to an individual voters personal information could alter that voters record in the system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The internet security company Dug Song is betting on

UM spinoff Censys, co-founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, PhD candidate David Adrian, and alum Zakir Durumeric, monitors all devices connected to the internet for threats. IT staff at companies can use Censys to discover new threats and assess their possible impact. The company attracted early attention from Duo Security's Dug Song, and plans to begin raising a much larger Series A round later in 2019 or in 2020. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Parabricks finds a niche to target its computing power

Parabricks LLC, a 2015 spinoff from the University of Michigan that signed an exclusive licensing agreement with the school last year, was co-founded by Prof. Scott Mahlke. In October, Parabricks was awarded a National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research Phase II grant of $748,000, which came with a matching grant of $125,000 from the Michigan Emerging Technologies Fund. That followed an NSF SBIR Phase I grant of $225,000 in 2017, which had a matching state grant of $25,000. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mahlke, Scott  

Q&A | Dont kid yourself, U.S. enemies are trying to hack our elections

As a national expert on election system security, Prof. J. Alex Halderman has never shied away from explaining how Americas election systems can and have been hacked. The University of Michigan computer science professor stops short of saying vote counts have been changed, but notes Russians tapped into voter registration lists in some states in 2016, and that he and fellow election-hack experts have demonstrated how state election systems can be infiltrated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

J. Alex Halderman on Election Systems and Vulnerabilities

C-SPAN Prof. J. Alex Halderman talked on C-SPAN about voting machine security and vulnerabilities in US election systems. He took questions from live callers and online viewers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

403 Forbidden Study reveals new data on region-specific website blocking practices

New work led by Prof. Roya Ensafi and PhD student Allison McDonald undertook the first wide-scale measurement study of server-side geographic restrictions, or geoblocking, a phenomenon in which websites block access for users in particular countries or regions, a phenomenon on the rise causing Internet balkanization. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ensafi, Roya  Graduate Students  Information Technology  Lab-Systems  

Understanding at every level

From quantum physics to computer systems: a profile of Pinaki Mazumder, professor of electrical engineering and computer science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mazumder, Pinaki  

A secure future for US elections starts in the classroom

Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been at the forefront of exposing vulnerabilities in electronic voting systems around the world. This Fall, Prof. Halderman and CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard are teaching a new special topics course on election cybersecurity, providing students with a deep examination of the past, present, and future of US elections with perspectives from computer security, tech policy, human factors, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  Undergraduate Students  

Ahead of important elections, U.S. voting system is still vulnerable to hacking

This CBC Radio Q&A with Prof. J. Alex Halderman focuses on vulnerabilities that exist in the US voting system, as well as telephone voting in Canada and the US. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

[Video] Art Meets Science: Tom Conrad's Journey from Apple to Pandora to Snapchat

Alumnus Tom Conrad (BSE CE 1992) recently visited campus as the 2018 CSE Alumni Merit Award recipient. Conrad, a software designer with a long career with major industry figures, delivered a lecture on finding his passion in the software world. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Should You Be Afraid of Election Hacking? Here's What Experts Say

This article examines what it means to hack an election and what vulnerabilities exist. Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted on where we are with respect to this challenge. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The midterms are already hacked. You just dont know it yet.

This in-depth investigation into the US election system reveals frightening vulnerabilities at almost every level. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard regarding some of vulnerabilities that exist. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Self-driving cars will have to decide who should live and who should die. Heres who humans would kill.

In this article, Prof. Benjamin Kuipers comments on a study that surveys preferences for who to spare when an autonomous vehicle must crash. Kuipers says that the focus should actually be "If we can imagine a situation where this dilemma could occur, what prior decision should I have made to avoid this?" [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

David Chesney to receive 2018 James T. Neubacher Award

The University of Michigans Council for Disability Concerns has named David Chesney, a lecturer in computer science and engineering, as the 2018 recipient of the James T. Neubacher Award. The award, established in October 1990, honors Neubacher, a U-M alumnus who was a columnist for the Detroit Free Press and an advocate for equal rights and opportunities for people with disabilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Health and Safety  

How hackable are American voting machines? It depends who you ask

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is on a crusade to demonstrate how vulnerable American voting machines are, and some of his arguments are quite compelling. He has rigged mock elections. He has testified to the machines vulnerabilities in Congress and in court. He has even managed to turn a commonly used voting machine into an iteration of the classic arcade game Pac-Man. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Security Seals Used to Protect Voting Machines Can Be Easily Opened With Shim Crafted from a Soda Can

Election officials say security ties and seals prevent anyone with physical access to voting machines from manipulating them. CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard has shown how he can easily defeat them with just a soda can. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Computing pioneer to receive honorary U-M doctorate

Forty years after her paradigm-shifting work in microchip design and education, Lynn Conway will receive an honorary Doctor of Science degree at Winter Commencement 2018 on the University of Michigans Ann Arbor campus. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Conway, Lynn  Women in Computing  

CSE students celebrate women in computing at Grace Hopper

8 women in CSE stood among nearly 20,000 at this years Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, the worlds largest gathering of women technologists, which is offered by AnitaB.org and the Association for Computing Machinery. Grads and undergrads traveled to the conference for career opportunities and presentations by women who hold lead positions across academia and industry. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  Women in Computing  

Two papers announced among 10 most influential in healthcare and infection control

Prof. Jenna Wiens group had two papers highlighted in a session on the top 10 most influential papers in healthcare epidemiology and infection control at Infectious Disease Week (IDWeek 2018). The papers were selected for their impact, the number of times they were cited in the preceding two years, and their potential effect on future research and technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

The logic of feeling: Teaching computers to identify emotions

Using machine learning to decode the unpredictable world of human emotion might seem like an unusual choice. But in the ambiguity of human expression, U-M computer science and engineering associate professor Emily Mower Provost has discovered a rich trove of data waiting to be analyzed. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Making software failures a little less catastrophic

Prof. Baris Kasikci presented a new technique called REPT REverse debugging with Processor Trace. In the paper REPT: Reverse Debugging of Failures in Deployed Software, Kasikci and collaborators propose a method to recreate the failing program execution to better diagnose the problem at hand. This technique is now deployed on Windows systems and the Windows Debugger platform. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Software Systems  

Todd Austin recognized for outstanding achievements

Prof. Todd Austin has been recognized with the University of Michigans Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award, which honors senior faculty who have consistently demonstrated outstanding achievements in the areas of scholarly research or creative endeavors, teaching and mentoring of students and junior faculty, and service. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Gaining a deeper understanding of how personal values are expressed in text

Content analysis of large collections of text is often a useful first step in understanding what people are talking or writing about. PhD student Steve Wilson, Prof. Rada Mihalcea, and Master student Yiting Shen have proposed a new method of performing these analyses in their paper, Building and Validating Hierarchical Lexicons with a Case Study on Personal Values. The researchers earned a Best Paper Award at the 2018 International Conference on Social Informatics (SocInfo) for their work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

The Tinder for Markets Is Run on Crypto

In this article, Lynn A. Conway Professor of CSE Michael Wellman comments on the hedge fund Numerai and its market, which crowdsources data scientists to make predictions and is based on the cryptocurrency Numeraire. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Tyche: A new permission model to defend against smart home hacks

Prof. Atul Prakash, CSE PhD student Kevin Eykholt, and CSE alumni Amir Rahmati and Earlence Fernandes have proposed Tyche, a safer app permissions system for smart homes and the Internet of Things. Their paper on this project, Tyche: A Risk-Based Permission Model for Smart Homes, received a Best Paper Award at the IEEE Cybersecurity Development Conference. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Systems  Prakash, Atul  

Michigan CS makes waves at Tapia 2018

Students in CSE got the chance to network and celebrate diversity in computing at the 2018 Richard Tapia Conference, which took place in Orlando, Florida on September 19 - 22. This years conference theme was Diversity: Roots of Innovation, acknowledging the historical role of diversity in STEM innovation and its essential role in innovating the future. CSE staff attended the conferences exhibition hall as an event sponsor, and were able to connect with a number of students regarding programs of study in computer science and engineering at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Jenkins, Chad  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Undergraduate Students  

A champion for women in computer science

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has been selected as the Center for the Education of Women (CEW+)s 2018 Carol Hollenshead Award recipient for her work to increase the pipeline and retention of women in engineering and computer science. Mihalcea has dedicated substantial effort to developing programs that introduce more women to the world of computing and encourage them to pursue graduate studies and research careers in the field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Norman Scott (1918-2018): In Memoriam

Norman Scott, professor emeritus of EECS, passed away on August 20, 2018 at the age of 100. Prof. Scott was recognized not only within U-M, but also nationally, for his work on digital computer logic and design. [Full Story]

2001: A Space Odyssey: From science fiction to science fact

Three leading researchers, including Profs. Rada Mihalcea and Ben Kuipers, explored the question of science and science fiction in a panel discussion Friday, Sept. 21 part of Michigan Engineerings celebration of the 50th anniversary of 2001: A Space Odyssey. The panel preceded a screening of the film with live orchestral and choral accompaniment. Michigan Engineering and the University Musical Society co-sponsored the screening, which was one of only three such live performances across the country this year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

May Mobility puts autonomous shuttles on the streets of Columbus, Ohio

May Mobility, the autonomous shuttle company founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, is training its vehicles to navigate the streets of Columbus. May has already launched their vehicles in Detroit, completed over 10,000 trips, and this is the second full implementation of the tech. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

All CSE News for 2018